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Thursday, August 16, 2012

Who is Euphemia Tika Sumpter?

Who is Euphemia Tika Sumpter? The entertainment and acting world knows her as Tika Sumpter, she is an American actress, singer, and model known for her roles as Layla Williamson on One Life to Live and recurring role as Raina Thorpe on Gossip Girl and as Jenna Rice in the The CW/BET sitcom, The Game. Sumpter  appeared in Sparkle which was directed by Salim Akil and written by his wife, Mara Brock Akil. The leading ladies, who will play sisters in the film, include Carmen Ejogo, Tika Sumpter and Jordin Sparks..

Personal Life

Tika was born June 20, 1980 in Hollis, Queens, New York, Sumpter studied at Marymount Manhattan College where she majored in communications.

Career

She began her career modeling and appeared in commercials for Hewlett-Packard and Liz Claiborne's Curve fragrances. In 2004, she served as the co-host for the N network series Best Friend's Date. The following year she landed the role of Layla Williamson on One Life to Live.
From January to May 2011, Sumpter appeared on Gossip Girl as Raina Thorpe, the daughter of Russell Thorpe and Chuck Bass/Nate' former love interest.[3]
She played singer Jason Derülo's girlfriend in the video for his song "It Girl".[4]










On September 12, 2011, it was announced that Sumpter would be playing one of the sister's name Deloris in the music-themed film Sparkle alongside Jordin Sparks, Whitney Houston, Derek Luke & Carmen Ejogo. Sparkle is a remake of the 1976 film of the same name inspired by the story of The Supremes. The remake was set in 1968 Detroit, during the rise of Motown. The story will focus on the youngest sister, a music prodigy named Sparkle Williams (Jordin Sparks), and her struggle to become a star while overcoming issues that are tearing her family apart.[5][6] R&B singer Aaliyah – originally tapped to star as Sparkle however following her death in a 2001 plane crash, production on the film had been derailed, production would have begun in 2002.[7][8][9] Sparkle was filmed in the fall of 2011 over a two month period.[10] The movie, starring both Sumpter will be released on August 17 in the United States. On May 21, 2012, "Celebrate", the last song Whitney Houston recorded with Sparks, premiered at RyanSeacrest.com. The song is the first official single featured on the Sparkle: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack album which Sumpter is apart of.[11] The accompanying music video for Celebrate was filmed on May 30, 2012 and the video featured herself and the rest of her Sparkle cast mates .[12]

Filmography

Film
Year Film Role Notes
2009 Brooklyn's Finest Neighborhood Girl
2010 Stomp the Yard 2: Homecoming Niki
Salt Front Deskwoman
2011 What's Your Number? Jamie
Whisper Me a Lullaby Emma Post-production
2012 Think Like a Man Dominic's Girlfriend
Sparkle Delores Williams
Television
Year Title Role Notes
2005–2011 One Life to Live Layla Williamson 234 episodes
Role held: July 15, 2005 - January 24, 2011
Nominated – Image Award for Outstanding Actress in a Daytime Drama (2008)
2006 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Vegas Episode 7.17 "Class"
2011 The Game Jenna Rice 9 episodes
Gossip Girl Raina Thorpe Recurring cast (Season 4; 11 episodes)
2012 Being Mary Jane
TV series

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Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Who is Christopher Julius Rock III?

Who is Christopher Julius Rock III? [6] The entertainment and acting world know him as Chris Rock, he is an American comedian, actor, screenwriter, television producer, film producer, and director.



After working as a standup comic and appearing in small film roles, Rock came to wider prominence as a cast member of Saturday Night Live in the early 1990s. He went on to more prominent film roles, and a series of acclaimed comedy specials for HBO.
He was voted in the US as the 5th greatest stand-up comedian of all time by Comedy Central.[9] He was also voted in the UK as the 9th greatest stand-up comic on Channel 4's 100 Greatest Stand-Ups in 2007, and again in the updated 2010 list as the 8th greatest stand-up comic.

Early life

Rock was born February 7, 1965 in Andrews, South Carolina. Shortly after his birth, his parents moved to Crown Heights, Brooklyn, New York. A few years later, they relocated and settled in the working-class area of Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn.[6] His mother, Rosalie (née Tingman), was a teacher and social worker for the mentally handicapped; his father, Julius Rock, was a former truck driver and newspaper deliveryman.[10] Julius died in 1988 after ulcer surgery.[11] His younger brothers Tony, Kenny[12] and Jordan[13] are also in the entertainment business. His older half-brother, Charles, died in 2006 after a long struggle with alcoholism.[14][15] Rock has said that he was influenced by the performing style of his paternal grandfather, Allen Rock, a preacher.[6][16]
Rock was bused to schools in predominately white neighborhoods of Brooklyn, where he endured bullying and beatings from white students.[17][18][19] As he got older, the bullying became worse and Rock's parents pulled him out of James Madison High School.[19] He decided to drop out of high school altogether and later received a GED. Rock worked menial jobs at various fast-food restaurants.[17][18]

Career

Early career

Rock began doing stand-up comedy in 1984 in New York City's Catch a Rising Star.[6][17] He slowly rose up the ranks of the comedy circuit in addition to earning bit roles in the film I'm Gonna Git You Sucka and the TV series Miami Vice. Upon seeing his act at a nightclub, Eddie Murphy befriended and mentored the aspiring comic. Murphy gave Rock his first film role in Beverly Hills Cop II.
George Carlin was probably the biggest influence for him.[3] Other major influences have been Sam Kinison, with whom he managed to hang out with,[3] Richard Pryor and Eddie Murphy.[1][3] Other influences have been Mort Sahl,[2] Rodney Dangerfield,[3] Bill Cosby, Woody Allen, Bill Hicks, Redd Foxx, Dick Gregory, Flip Wilson, Steve Martin and Pigmeat Markham. Among the contemporaries, in 2008 he said he enjoys Chris Tucker and Adam Sandler.[3]

Saturday Night Live

Rock became a cast member of the popular sketch comedy series Saturday Night Live in 1990. He and other new cast members Chris Farley, Adam Sandler, Rob Schneider and David Spade became known as the Bad Boys of SNL. In 1991, he released his first comedy album Born Suspect and won acclaim for his dramatic role as a crack addict in the film New Jack City. His tenure on SNL gave Rock national exposure.

Standup success

A frustrated Rock left Saturday Night Live in 1993, appearing instead as a "special guest" star on the predominantly African American sketch show In Living Color. The show, however, was canceled months later. Rock then decided to concentrate on a film career. He wrote and starred in the mockumentary CB4 but the film was not a success. Acting jobs became scarce, and Rock abandoned Hollywood to concentrate on stand-up comedy.[16]
Rock starred in his first HBO comedy special in 1994 titled Big Ass Jokes. But it was his second stand-up special, 1996's Bring the Pain, that reinvented Rock as one of the best comedians in the industry.[20][21] For it Rock won two Emmy Awards and gained large critical acclaim.[22] The segment on race in America, in which Rock used the "N word" extensively was most talked about.[22] Adding to his popularity was his much-publicized role as a commentator for Comedy Central's Politically Incorrect during the 1996 Presidential elections[20] which earned him another Emmy nomination.[23] Rock also was the voice for the "Lil Penny" puppet who was the alter ego to basketball star Penny Hardaway in a series of Nike shoe commercials from 1994–1998,[20] and hosted the '97 MTV Video Music Awards.
Rock later had two more HBO comedy specials: Bigger & Blacker in 1999, and Never Scared in 2004. Articles relating to both specials called Rock "the funniest man in America" in Time[24] and Entertainment Weekly.[2] HBO also aired his talk show, The Chris Rock Show, which gained critical acclaim for Rock's interviews with celebrities and politicians. The show won an Emmy for writing. His television work has won him a total of three Emmy Awards and 15 nominations.[23] By the end of the decade, Rock was established as one of the preeminent stand-up comedians and comic minds of his generation.
During this time, Rock also translated his comedy into print form in the book Rock This! and released the Grammy Award-winning comedy albums, Roll with the New, Bigger & Blacker and Never Scared.
Rock's fifth HBO special, Kill the Messenger, premiered on September 27, 2008, and won him another Emmy for outstanding writing for a variety or music program.[25]

Film and television

It was not until the success of his stand-up act in the late 1990s that Rock began receiving major parts in films. These include roles in Dogma, Beverly Hills Ninja, Lethal Weapon 4, Nurse Betty, The Longest Yard, Bad Company, and a starring role in Down to Earth. Rock has also increasingly worked behind the camera, both as a writer and director of Head of State and I Think I Love My Wife. In the fall of 2005, the UPN television network premiered a comedy series called Everybody Hates Chris, based on Rock's school days, of which he is the executive producer and narrator. The show has garnered both critical and ratings success.[26] The series was nominated for a 2006 Golden Globe for Best TV Series (Musical or Comedy), a 2006 People's Choice Award for Favorite New Television Comedy, and two 2006 Emmy Awards for costuming and cinematography.[27] Following the release of his first documentary, 2009's Good Hair, Rock is working on a documentary about debt called Credit Is the Devil.[28]

Academy Awards

In early 2005, Rock hosted the 77th Academy Awards ceremony. The decision to have Rock host the awards was seen by some as a chance to bring an "edge" to the ceremony, and to make it more relevant or appealing to younger audiences. Jokingly, Rock opened by saying "Welcome to the 77th and LAST Academy Awards!" During one segment Rock asked, "Who is this guy?" in reference to actor Jude Law seemingly appearing in every movie Rock had seen that year and implied Law was a low-rent Tom Cruise (he made a joke about filmmakers rushing production when unable to get the actors they want: "If you want Tom Cruise and all you can get is Jude Law, wait [to make the film]!"). Subsequently, a defensive Sean Penn took the stage to present and said, "In answer to our host's question, Jude Law is one of our finest young actors." (At the time, Penn and Law were shooting All the King's Men.) Law was not the only actor that Rock poked fun at that evening, however—he turned the joke on himself at one point, saying, "If you want Denzel [Washington] and all you can get is me, wait!" Older Oscar officials were reportedly displeased with Rock's performance, which did not elevate ratings for the ceremony.[29] Rock was also criticized for referring to the Oscars as "idiotic", and asserting that heterosexual men do not watch them, in an interview prior to Oscar night.[30][31]

Music videos

Rock's first music video was for his song "Your Mother's Got a Big Head" from his album Born Suspect. Rock also made videos for his songs "Champagne" from Roll With the New and "No Sex (In the Champagne Room)" from Bigger & Blacker. Chris Rock also directed and appeared in the music video for the Red Hot Chili Peppers song "Hump de Bump".
Rock appeared in the Big Daddy Kane music video "Smooth Operator" as a guy getting his hair cut.
He also appeared in Johnny Cash's "God's Gonna Cut You Down", one of the many celebrities seen lip-synching the song.

Stage plays

In 2011, Rock appeared on Broadway in Stephen Adly Guirgis' play The Motherfucker with the Hat[32] with Bobby Cannavale and Annabella Sciorra.[32] Rock was nominated for a Drama League Award.

Comedic style and views

Rock's subject matter typically involves family, politics, romance, music, class relationships, and race relations in the United States. Though not strictly autobiographical, much of his comic standpoint seem rooted in his teenage experience; his strict parents, concerned about the inadequacies of the local school system, arranged to have the adolescent Rock bused to a nearly all-white high school in Bensonhurst (an Italian-ethnic neighborhood of Brooklyn known at the time for poor race relations). In his memoir Rock This, the comedian recalls, "My parents assumed I'd get a better education in a better neighborhood. What I actually got was a worse education in a worse neighborhood. And a whole bunch of ass-whippings."[33]
The comedian has also expressed discomfort with the notion that success in standup comedy—or, indeed, in any aspect of the entertainment industry—should oblige him to serve as a role model. In this position, he finds himself directly at odds with one of his comic idols, Bill Cosby. Cosby has reprimanded Rock both explicitly—for his famous/notorious Niggas vs. Black People track—and implicitly, for heavy use of the word "nigger."[34] Rock has not wavered from a position explored in his 1996 Roll With The New show, and reiterated in his 1997 memoir: "Why does the public expect entertainers to behave better than everybody else? It's ridiculous...Of course, this is just for black entertainers. You don't see anyone telling Jerry Seinfeld he's a good role model. Because everyone expects whites to behave themselves...Nowadays, you've got to be an entertainer and a leader. It's too much."[35] Often the subject of tabloids, when asked about paparazzi and the other negative aspects of fame, Rock says he accepts the bad with the good: "You can't be happy that fire cooks your food and be mad it burns your fingertips."[36]
At the London Live Earth concert on July 7, 2007, which was broadcast live on the BBC, before introducing the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Rock called the crowd "motherfuckers" and "shit" after a brief sigh when he said he was joking. Due to the broadcast being at 5:45 pm Rock was immediately cut off, and the BBC made several apologies for his use of the word "motherfucker".[37]
Chris Rock has been an avid fan of the New York Mets baseball team since childhood. He famously complained that his team "had no money" in a comedic rant during a 2011 interview with David Letterman.[38]

Personal life

Rock has been married to Malaak Compton-Rock since November 23, 1996.[39] She is the founder and executive director of StyleWorks, a non-profit, full-service salon that provides free services for women leaving welfare and entering the workforce.[39] They have two daughters together, Lola Simone (born June 28, 2002) and Zahra Savannah (born May 22, 2004).[40]
In November 2006, the entertainment news website TMZ.com reported that Rock was filing for divorce after nearly ten years of marriage to Malaak.[41] Two weeks later, however, TMZ reported that Rock had not filed divorce papers, and that it appeared that the couple had been able to work out their differences and stay together.[42] In response to the reports, the Rocks released a statement to the press denouncing them as "untrue rumors and lies".[39]
In 2007, freelance journalist and former actress Kali Bowyer filed a paternity suit against Chris Rock, claiming he was the father of her son, and in need of hospitalization.[43] DNA testing proved that Rock was not the child's father. Rock resides in Alpine, New Jersey.[45]
 
In 2008, Rock's family history was profiled on the PBS series African American Lives 2. A DNA test showed that he is descended from the Udeme people of northern Cameroon.[46] Rock's great-great-grandfather, Julius Caesar Tingman, was a slave for 21 years before serving as part of the United States Colored Troops until 1866; Tingman fought in the American Civil War. During the 1940s, Rock's paternal grandfather moved from South Carolina to New York City to become a taxicab driver and preacher.[47]

Work

Filmography

Year Title Role Notes
1985 Krush Groove Person Standing Next to Phone During Fight in Club uncredited
1987 Beverly Hills Cop II Playboy Mansion Valet
1988 Comedy's Dirtiest Dozen Himself Direct-to-video Concert film
1988 I'm Gonna Git You Sucka Rib Joint Customer
1989 Who Is Chris Rock? Himself Documentary Short
1991 New Jack City Pookie
1992 Boomerang Bony T
1993 CB4 Albert Brown/M.C. Gusto Also wrote story, screenplay and was co-producer
1995 The Immortals Deke Anthony
1995 Panther Yuck Mouth
1996 Sgt. Bilko 1st Lt. Oster
1997 Beverly Hills Ninja Joey Washington
1998 Dr. Dolittle Rodney Voice
1998 Lethal Weapon 4 Detective Lee Butters
1999 Torrance Rises Himself Documentary short
1999 Dogma Rufus
2000 Nurse Betty Wesley
2001 Down to Earth Lance Barton Also co-writer and executive producer
2001 AI: Artificial Intelligence Mecha Comedian Voice/cameo
2001 Pootie Tang JB/Radio DJ/Pootie's Father Also producer
2001 Osmosis Jones Osmosis Jones Voice
2001 Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back Chaka Luther King Cameo
2002 Bad Company Jake Hayes/Kevin Pope/Michael Turner
2002 Comedian Himself Documentary
2003 Pauly Shore Is Dead Himself Cameo
2003 Head of State Mays Gilliam Also director, producer and co-writer
2004 The N-Word Himself Documentary
2004 Paparazzi Pizza Delivery Guy Cameo
2005 The Aristocrats Himself Documentary
2005 Madagascar Marty Voice
2005 The Longest Yard Farrell Caretaker
2007 I Think I Love My Wife Richard Marcus Cooper Also director and co-writer
2007 Bee Movie Mooseblood the Mosquito Voice
2008 You Don't Mess with the Zohan Taxi Driver Cameo
2008 Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa Marty and other zebras Voice
2009 Good Hair Himself Documentary
2010 Death at a Funeral Aaron Also producer, Remake of the 2007 film of the same name
2010 Grown Ups Kurt McKenzie
2012 2 Days in New York Mingus
2012 What to Expect When You're Expecting Vic
2012 Madagascar 3 Marty Voice
2013 Grown Ups 2 Kurt McKenzie

Discography

Year Album Peak positions Certifications
U.S. U.S.
R&B
1991 Born Suspect
1997 Roll with the New 93 41
1999 Bigger & Blacker 44 26
2005 Never Scared

Television

Year Title Role Notes
1987 Uptown Comedy Express Himself HBO special
1987 Miami Vice Carson Episode: "Missing Hours"
1990–1993 Saturday Night Live Various Cast member
1993–1994 In Living Color Various Recurring
1994 Big Ass Jokes Himself HBO special
1995 The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air Maurice/Jasmine Episode: "Get a Job"
1996–1998 The Moxy Show Flea Uncredited voice role
1996 Martin Valentino Episode: "The Love Jones Connection"
1996 Homicide: Life on the Street Carver Episode: "Requiem for Adena"
1996 Bring the Pain Himself HBO special
1996 Politically Incorrect Himself Correspondent
1997 MTV Music Video Awards Himself Host
1997–2000 The Chris Rock Show Himself Cast member, writer
1998 King of the Hill Roger "Booda" Sack Episode: "Traffic Jam"
1999 MTV Music Video Awards Himself Host
2000 Bigger & Blacker Himself HBO special
2003 MTV Music Video Awards Himself HBO special
2004 ChalkZone Boris the Burger Episode: "If You Can't Beat 'Em, Eat 'Em"
2004 Never Scared Himself HBO special
2005 77th Academy Awards Himself Host
2005–2009 Everybody Hates Chris Narrator/Mr. Abbott Creator/Narrator/Chris' guidance counselor
2008 Kill the Messenger Himself HBO special
2011 Louie Himself 1 Episode
2012 Tosh.0 Himself 1 Episode

Internet

Year Title Role Notes
2012 The Annoying Orange Marty Episode: Big Top Orange
cameo appearance
guest star
2012 Rap Battle Parody Tremendous Repeat Episode: 4

Books































 

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Sunday, August 12, 2012

Who is Tyson Cleotis Chandler?

Who is Tyson Cleotis Chandler? The sports world knows hims as Tyson Chandler, he is an American professional basketball center who currently plays for the New York Knicks of the National Basketball Association. Chandler was the second overall pick of the 2001 NBA Draft by the Los Angeles Clippers, then was immediately traded to the Chicago Bulls. He has also played for the New Orleans Hornets, Charlotte Bobcats, and Dallas Mavericks. As starting center for Dallas, he helped win the franchise's first NBA championship in 2011. He was also a member of the United States men's national basketball team's gold medal run in the 2010 FIBA Basketball World Cup.

Early life and high school career

Chandler was born October 2, 1982 to a single mother. He and his two brothers, Terrell and Tervon, grew up in their family's farm in Hanford, California, just south of Fresno, California. Chandler began playing basketball at three years old on a basket Chandler's grandfather, Cleotis, fixed on a tree. Chandler grew up doing farm work such as milking cows, slopping pigs, and cultivating crops. At nine years old Chandler and his mother moved to San Bernadino, California; he was already nearly six feet tall. As a child Chandler was teased because of his height; children on his school basketball team joked that he was older than he really was, and that he had been left back several times in school.[1]
Chandler and his family then moved to Compton, California, where he enrolled at Dominguez High School, a school known for its athletics, producing basketball players such as Dennis Johnson and Cedric Ceballos. In his freshman year, Chandler made the varsity team and played with future NBA player Tayshaun Prince, who was then a senior. With the Dominguez Dons, Chandler became a teenage sensation; current players such as DeMar DeRozan watched him play and claimed "he was like Shaq". Milwaukee Bucks guard Brandon Jennings, who was a ball boy for Dominguez at the time, said, "You'd see the girls around Tyson, the Escalade he drove, and you wanted to be like him,"[2] Chandler earned accolades from Parade Magazine and USA Today, and was selected to the McDonald's High School All-America Team. As a freshman, he was profiled on current affairs TV program 60 Minutes.
In his junior year, Chandler averaged 20 points, 12 rebounds, 6 assists and 3 blocks. In his senior year, Chandler led Dominguez to a state championship and a 31-4 record, averaging 26 points, 15 boards, and 8 blocks a game.[1] Chandler was recruited by several universities and considered UCLA, Arizona, Syracuse, Memphis, Kentucky and Michigan. Chandler then declared for the 2001 NBA draft as a prep-to-pro.

Professional career

Chicago Bulls (2001-2006)

Tyson Chandler was selected 2nd overall by the Los Angeles Clippers, who immediately traded his rights to the Chicago Bulls for former NBA Rookie of the Year Award recipient Elton Brand. The Bulls intended to pair Chandler with fellow high school phenomenon Eddy Curry in the front court. However, while both players had stretches of success during their time with the Bulls, they rarely coincided. In Chandler's case, back problems were a recurring issue throughout his career, particularly during the 2003–04 season. During the early part of his career, Chandler feuded with Brendan Haywood of the Washington Wizards and Amar'e Stoudemire of the Phoenix Suns. Later, although the feuds became less frequent, Chandler struggled with foul trouble, which limited his playing time.
Chandler also played a major role in the resurgent Bulls' playoff run in the 2004–05 season. Finding a role as a fourth-quarter defensive specialist, with notable game-saving blocks against stars like Paul Pierce and Carmelo Anthony, he was rewarded with a long-term deal to remain with the Chicago Bulls for the next six years, reportedly worth close to $63 million. With Curry's departure after the 2004–05 season, Chandler became the last member of the Bulls left from the Jerry Krause era.
During the 2005–2006 season, Chandler's biggest impact was on defense, but he struggled again with foul problems and averaged only 5.3 points per game. Due in part to his sub-par playoff performance and the Bulls' signing of four-time Defensive Player of the Year Ben Wallace in the off-season after the 2005–2006 season, Bulls GM John Paxson began to consider moving Chandler. On July 5, 2006, the Bulls and the Hornets verbally agreed to a trade that would send Chandler to the New Orleans Hornets in exchange for J.R. Smith and P.J. Brown.[3] The deal was finalized the following week.[4]

New Orleans Hornets (2006-2009)


In his first year in New Orleans, Chandler had a breakout season in 2006–2007, averaging 9.5 ppg and 12.4 rpg to go with 1.8 bpg.
Chandler followed that up with an even better season where he put up 11.7 points and 11.8 rebounds a game and led the league in offensive rebounding. His defense, rebounding and the ability to connect with Chris Paul on the Crescent City Connection (Name for their alleyoop pass) allowed the Hornets to claim the 2007–08 Southwest division for the first time ever with 56 wins. Chandler played well in the playoffs and defended Tim Duncan valiantly but in the end the Hornets lost a heartbreaking Game 7 where Chandler limited Duncan to 5–17 shooting.
Chandler was named to Team USA as the number 1 alternate to compete in the 2008 Beijing Olympics.
In 197 regular season games with the Hornets franchise, Chandler averaged 10.2 ppg, 11.3 rpg and 1.4 bpg, while shooting 61.1% from the field. On February 17, 2009, Chandler was traded to the Oklahoma City Thunder for Chris Wilcox, Joe Smith and the rights to DeVon Hardin.[5] However, he failed the physical because of a toe injury, and one day later, the Thunder announced that they rescinded the trade.[6] Coincidentally, the doctor in Oklahoma City who failed Chandler on the physical was the same doctor who had performed corrective surgery on the toe two years earlier.[7]

Charlotte Bobcats (2009-2010)

On July 28, 2009, he was traded to the Charlotte Bobcats in exchange for Emeka Okafor.[8] Chandler joined a Bobcats team that had never made the playoffs in their young history. Chandler struggled with injuries in 2009–10, missing more than a month with a stress fracture in his left foot. Chandler still helped the Bobcats win 44 games and earn their first-ever postseason berth. The Bobcats, led by Gerald Wallace and Stephen Jackson, made it to the playoffs as the seventh seed in the Eastern Conference, and went up against the Orlando Magic. Chandler had the task of defending Dwight Howard. Chandler limited Howard to 9 points and 9 rebounds per game, both below his season and career averages.[9] The Bobcats were, however, swept in their first trip to the playoffs.

Dallas Mavericks (2010-2011)

On July 13, 2010, Chandler was traded to the Dallas Mavericks, along with Alexis Ajinça, in exchange for Matt Carroll, Erick Dampier and Eduardo Nájera.[10] Chandler was expected to shine next to all-stars Dirk Nowitzki and point guard Jason Kidd. Chandler quickly became a fan-favorite in Dallas because of his defensive efforts and athleticism on both ends of the floor. He was credited with making the Mavericks "tough" and anchoring the defense with his hustle and intensity.[11] The Mavericks went 57–25, earning the third seed in the western conference. They defeated a deep Portland Trail Blazers team in six games, swept Kobe Bryant and the Los Angeles Lakers, and defeated Kevin Durant and the Oklahoma City Thunder in 5 games. The Mavericks went in to the NBA Finals as an underdog,[12][13] facing the Miami Heat and their "Big Three" of LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh. Chandler was instrumental in the series,[14] defensively stopping LeBron James' and Dwyane Wade's penetration to the rim. Chandler was forced to play major minutes because of an injury to backup center Brendan Haywood and the inexperience of Ian Mahinmi[citation needed]. In game 5, Chandler recorded 13 points and 16 rebounds. In the decisive game 6, Chandler recorded 13 points, 7 rebounds and 2 blocks, helping the Mavericks win their first championship.[15] For his defensive efforts throughout regular season, Chandler was selected to the All-Defensive Second Team.

New York Knicks (2011-present)

On December 9, 2011, Chandler announced that he agreed to terms on a four-year contract with the New York Knicks worth $58 million.[16] He was officially acquired by the Knicks in a three-team sign-and-trade.[17] On Opening Day, Christmas 2011, Chandler finished with 7 points, 3 rebounds, 2 assists and 6 blocks in a 106–104 win over the Boston Celtics.
Chandler finished the regular season with a 67.9% field goal percentage, the third highest in NBA history, exceeded only by Wilt Chamberlain in 1967 (68.26%) and 1973 (72.7%).[18] He won the 2012 NBA Defensive Player of the Year Award with 45 first place votes and 311 points overall, ahead of Serge Ibaka of the Oklahoma City Thunder with 41 first place votes and 294 votes,[19] and became the first ever Knick to win the award.[20]
In May 2012, Chandler was named second team All-Defensive behind Ibaka and Dwight Howard of the Orlando Magic, who made first-team All-Defensive.[21] Although Chandler was voted Defensive Player of the Year by the press, the All-Defensive Team is chosen by the league's 30 head coaches (who cannot vote for their own players). And while his 13 first-team votes and 36 overall points were more than the totals for first-team selections Tony Allen of the Memphis Grizzlies and Chris Paul of the Los Angeles Clippers, Howard received 41 points with 16 first-team votes, and only one center can be named to the team.[22]

United States national team

Chandler was chosen to play for the United States men's basketball team in the 2012 London Summer Olympics.

Career transactions

Personal life

Until the age of 10, Chandler grew up on a farm in central California.[26]
Chandler and his wife Kimberly organized a charity to help New Orleans families who suffered from Hurricane Katrina. The charity helped purchase "small things" (as Chandler said) for the families' homes: TVs, stoves, microwaves, refrigerators, pots, pans etc. The wives of Chandler's teammates helped in the efforts.[27]
His paternal grandmother is of German descent.[28]
He was the subject of a limited edition 100 copy zine titled "Tyson Chandler". The zine was created in fall 2011 by Camilla Venturini and the photographer Ari Marcopoulos, and was the subject of a lengthy article in the Wall Street Journal.[29]

NBA career statistics

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field-goal percentage  3P%  3-point field-goal percentage  FT%  Free-throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

Regular season

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2001–02 Chicago 71 31 19.6 .497 .000 .604 4.8 .8 .4 1.3 6.1
2002–03 Chicago 75 68 24.4 .531 .000 .608 6.9 1.0 .5 1.4 9.2
2003–04 Chicago 35 8 22.3 .424 .000 .669 7.7 .7 .5 1.2 6.1
2004–05 Chicago 80 10 27.4 .494 .000 .673 9.7 .8 .9 1.8 8.0
2005–06 Chicago 79 50 26.8 .565 .000 .503 9.0 1.0 .5 1.3 5.3
2006–07 NO/Oklahoma City 73 73 34.6 .624 .000 .527 12.4 .9 .5 1.8 9.5
2007–08 New Orleans 79 79 35.2 .623 .000 .593 11.7 1.0 .6 1.1 11.8
2008–09 New Orleans 45 45 32.1 .565 .000 .579 8.7 .5 .3 1.2 8.8
2009–10 Charlotte 51 27 22.8 .574 .000 .732 6.3 1.1 .3 1.1 6.5
2010–11 Dallas 74 74 27.8 .654 .000 .732 9.4 .4 .5 1.1 10.1
2011–12 New York 62 62 33.2 .679 .000 .689 9.9 .9 .9 1.4 11.3
Career
724 527 28.1 .578 .000 .633 8.9 .8 .6 1.4 8.6

Playoffs

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2005 Chicago 6 0 28.7 .475 .000 .696 9.7 1.3 .2 2.2 11.7
2006 Chicago 6 0 17.3 .667 .000 .300 4.5 .5 .3 .3 1.8
2008 New Orleans 12 12 34.3 .632 .000 .625 10.3 .4 .4 1.7 8.0
2009 New Orleans 4 4 23.5 .500 .000 .500 5.3 .5 .5 .2 3.8
2010 Charlotte 4 0 15.0 .545 .000 .667 2.5 .5 .5 .8 3.5
2011 Dallas 21 21 32.4 .582 .000 .679 9.2 .4 .6 .9 8.0
2012 New York 5 5 33.4 .440 .000 .600 9.0 .8 1.4 1.4 6.2
Career
58 42 29.1 .562 .000 .644 8.2 .6 .6 1.1 7.0

















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